Recipient FAQ

Why would someone need an egg donor?
Can I use my own doctor if I choose and egg donor from Footsteps?
Can I use my own doctor if I choose and egg donor from Footsteps?
How do I choose a donor?

 

Why would someone need an egg donor?

How old are your donors?
Where do you find your donors?
Where do you find your donors?
What happens if my cycle is cancelled?
What happens after I have a child and I need to contact my donor?
Patients need egg donors for a variety of reasons, the most common being age related. Sometimes however, the need for an egg donor stems from cancer treatment, premature ovarian failure, or genetic abnormalities that were present from birth. As a woman gets older (usually around age 40 but sometimes earlier), ovarian function begins to decline and egg quality becomes such that a viable pregnancy and baby will not result. A woman may still be having regular menstrual cycles, but the eggs that are present are of such poor quality that the only way to successfully reproduce is by using eggs obtained from a younger person (usually less than 33). However, it is sometimes difficult to know if a patient is able to reproduce with her own eggs. Doctors use tests that screen for ovarian reserve to help with this determination. Success rates from treatments with the assisted reproductive technologies are usually determined by the age of the egg provider. A woman who is younger than 33 years of age will have a much higher success rate than a woman older than 35. After age 40, success rates with In Vitro Fertilization decrease dramatically.

Can I use my own doctor if I choose an egg donor from Footsteps?

Yes, you are able to use any physician that you choose. The Footsteps to Family staff will work closely with your donor and the clinical contact to ensure that all required screening has been done, that all necessary appointments are made, and  the donor is aware of her responsibilities throughout the entire process.

How do I choose a donor?

Typically, a recipient will select a donor who has a resemblance to them in either physical characteristics, ethnicity, family background, etc. However, there are times when a recipient is drawn to a donor for no particular reason. It is important to trust your decision and selection.

When you are searching for donors, it is suggested that you start with as broad of criteria as possible and then narrow your search from there.

It is also important to review not only the donor’s information but to review the demographic information of the family as well, as the egg will have all of those genes.

How old are your donors?

Our donors are between the ages of 21 and 33.

Where do you find your donors?

We recruit donors on college campuses, online and in publications that target our demographic. We also have a large number of donors who are referred to us from our existing donor pool as well as those who find us on their own due to research they have done on our reputable program.

Why would someone become a donor?

As fertility issues are talked about more in the mainstream, more young women are stepping forward to assist people in their quest to become parents. Some of the reasons our donors have given us for their interest in becoming a donor include:

  • They know someone who has been affected by infertility and this is a way for them to be of assistance.
  • They are not interested in having children but want to help someone else who does.
  • They have children of their own and they cannot imagine not being able to experience the joy of being a parent.

What happens if my cycle is cancelled?

If a cycle is cancelled prior to retrieval but after the donor has started injectable medications, and the physician determines that the donor was compliant and through no fault of her own, the cycle was not successful, she is compensated $500. If a cycle is cancelled prior to retrieval but once the donor has started her hormone injections, and the physician determines that the donor was compliant and through no fault of her own, the cycle was not successful, she is compensated 25% of the donor stipend. The remaining stipend remains on account and we will work with you to find another donor that suits your needs. Your only financial responsibility is to replenishing the donor stipend account for your new donor and obtaining another donor insurance policy.

If the physician determines the donor was non-compliant, she will not be compensated at all and will be invoiced for the clinical costs incurred on her behalf. There is no guarantee that funds will be recovered, however, we will work on your behalf to attempt to collect and return any money due to you. Again the stipend remains on account and we would work closely with you to find a new donor.

If you decide that you are not interested in finding another donor, the stipend money along with any unused reserve funds will be returned to you. The agency fee is non-refundable.

What happens after I have a child and I need to contact my donor?

As part of our licensure with the state of New York, we are required to keep donor records for 18 years after our last donor cycle.  We are also required to have an active way for recipients to communicate with us.  Should you need to contact your donor within that time frame, we would be able to assist you in finding her.  Any related search fees would be the responsibility of the recipient.


Blood Type Calculator Find out blood type combinations
Glossary Learn more with our terms
SIGN INTO YOUR ACCOUNT CREATE NEW ACCOUNT

 
×
CREATE ACCOUNT ALREADY HAVE AN ACCOUNT?
 
×
FORGOT YOUR DETAILS?
×

Go up